Saltaire History On Facebook

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Furniture in Flowers

The Victorians started the horticultural art of floral displays that remained popular well into the 20th century. Bradford’s Wibsey Park was noted for its spectacular creations and of course there was competition from the neighbours, like Bowling Park’s marvellous grand piano. Chelsea Flower Show eat your heart out.

Inspiration for what to do whilst staying at home after a trip to the garden centre perhaps?

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Robyn Surbuts

Signed And Designed By David Hockney…..

Titus Salt started a tradition of feeding the great and the good at the opening of Saltaire Mill in 1853. 134 years later Johnathan Silver reopened Salts Mill with an event and menu designed by David Hockney.

An artist from the Illustrated London News sketched the head table at Titus Salt’s 50th birthday bash, timed to coincide with the formal ceremony to open the mill. Looking younger than more familiar portraits, Titus is recognisable by his high forehead. Heavily pregnant with their youngest child Ada, wife Caroline sporting a jaunty bonnet was seated to Titus’s left.

A further treasured “lockdown” discovery whilst de-cluttering was another David Hockney designed menu for Salts Diner; both items of ephemera signed by Mr Hockney himself.

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Pictures

1. David Hockney signed menu for Salts Mill 1987
2. 1853 opening of Saltaire Mill in the Illustrated London News
3. 1993 menu signed by David Hockney
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Signed And Designed By David Hockney…..

Titus Salt started a tradition of feeding the great and the good at the opening of Saltaire Mill in 1853.   134 years later Johnathan Silver reopened Salts Mill with an event and menu designed by David Hockney.

An artist from the Illustrated London News sketched the head table at Titus Salt’s 50th birthday bash, timed to coincide with the formal ceremony to open the mill.  Looking younger than more familiar portraits, Titus is recognisable by his high forehead.  Heavily pregnant with their youngest child Ada, wife Caroline sporting a jaunty bonnet was seated to Titus’s left.

A further treasured “lockdown” discovery whilst de-cluttering was another David Hockney designed menu for Salts Diner; both items of ephemera signed by Mr Hockney himself.

©

Pictures

1. David Hockney signed menu for Salts Mill 1987
2. 1853 opening of Saltaire Mill in the Illustrated London News
3. 1993 menu signed by David HockneyImage attachmentImage attachment

The Riot Act Has Been Read

On May 3 1826,Titus Salt, a brave young man a few months short of his 23rd birthday, faced a mob that was attacking Horsfall’s Mill near Bradford Cathedral. A Special Constable, Titus reasoned and remonstrated in vain with the desperate hand loom rioters who were against the installation of weaving machinery.

The military was called and the Riot Act was read, a 19th century version of “Stay At Home”. The casualties included two dead and numbers of men and boys injured. A hard lesson - there was no stopping the effect of the Industrial Revolution on the old skills and occupations.

The mill owner John Horsfall had a substantial villa built in the fashionable suburb of Manningham. Grade II Listed Bolton Royd House is at 288 Manningham Lane, BD8.

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The Riot Act Has Been Read
 
On May 3 1826,Titus Salt, a brave young man a few months short of his 23rd birthday, faced a mob that was attacking Horsfall’s Mill near Bradford Cathedral.  A Special Constable, Titus reasoned and remonstrated in vain with the desperate hand loom rioters who were against the installation of weaving machinery.
 
The military was called and the Riot Act was read, a 19th century version of “Stay At Home”.  The casualties included two dead and numbers of men and boys injured.  A hard lesson - there was no stopping the effect of the Industrial Revolution on the old skills and occupations.
 
The mill owner John Horsfall had a substantial villa built in the fashionable suburb of Manningham.  Grade II Listed Bolton Royd House is at 288 Manningham Lane, BD8.
 
©Image attachmentImage attachment

The Old Theatre Royal - with many thanks to Bradford Civic Society for inviting me to contribute to their “Bradford as told in Blue Plaques” series

The weather beaten plaque marking where Bradford’s first purpose-built theatre stood is an apt reminder of the 1841 building nick-named “the old wooden box”. Originally the Liver it became the Theatre Royal in 1844, but apart from stone pillars from Manor Hall, Kirkgate to smarten the entrance, it was rough and ready with planks for seats for the audiences of “horny-handed men who liked good acting…”. It had nevertheless one of the best companies in the provinces.

Near the theatre was Manor Row, where Daniel Salt and family had lived and North Parade to where son Sir Titus brought home his bride. In 1866 the Bradford Club, which had Antonio Fattorini, Delius’s father Julius and Titus Salt as members, moved into premises on the corner of Upper Piccadilly. This Grade II Listed building by Saltaire’s architects Lockwood and Mawson is now called Angel House.

The Saturday night crowd was particularly raucous. Between acts, people were tossed from the gallery into the pit, resulting in warnings that Constables would eject offenders. Never let it be said that Bradford doesn’t know how to enjoy itself.

After the Midland Station opened, families left for fashionable Manningham and textile merchants moved their goods into the area. And so in 1867 the curtain came down for the final time in the Old Theatre Royal and a warehouse was built on the site for Mr Willey.
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The Old Theatre Royal - with many thanks to Bradford Civic Society for inviting me to contribute to their “Bradford as told in Blue Plaques” series
 
The weather beaten plaque marking where Bradford’s first purpose-built theatre stood is an apt reminder of the 1841 building nick-named “the old wooden box”.  Originally the Liver it became the Theatre Royal in 1844, but apart from stone pillars from Manor Hall, Kirkgate to smarten the entrance, it was rough and ready with planks for seats for the audiences of “horny-handed men who liked good acting…”. It had nevertheless one of the best companies in the provinces.
 
Near the theatre was Manor Row, where Daniel Salt and family had lived and North Parade to where son Sir Titus brought home his bride.  In 1866 the Bradford Club, which had Antonio Fattorini, Delius’s father Julius and Titus Salt as members, moved into premises on the corner of Upper Piccadilly.  This Grade II Listed building by Saltaire’s architects Lockwood and Mawson is now called Angel House.

The Saturday night crowd was particularly raucous.  Between acts, people were tossed from the gallery into the pit, resulting in warnings that Constables would eject offenders.  Never let it be said that Bradford doesn’t know how to enjoy itself.
 
After the Midland Station opened, families left for fashionable Manningham and textile merchants moved their goods into the area. And so in 1867 the curtain came down for the final time in the Old Theatre Royal and a warehouse was built on the site for Mr Willey.Image attachmentImage attachment

The Glass Fairies of Saltaire

Every time my hedge is cut a treasure trove of drinking vessels emerges. Sadly, the sprites are now self-isolating and won’t plonk more empty pint pots in my privet until the demise of the coronavirus.
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The Glass Fairies of Saltaire

Every time my hedge is cut a treasure trove of drinking vessels emerges.  Sadly, the sprites are now self-isolating and won’t plonk more empty pint pots in my privet until the demise of the coronavirus.Image attachmentImage attachment

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Now that we are all in lockdown, and we're all keeping our bushes well trimmed, it's amazing what we find.....now that could lead into a Frankie Howerd joke. Hope it brought a smile to everyone's face. No offence meant.

I have collected a few out of other peoples hedges lol! Been some nice designs :)

Yes 👏👏😂 we used to have the same! Xx

Mad!

Oct 232013
 
History of the building of Saltaire

Saltaire World Heritage Site is not a museum.  It is a living, breathing, exciting and vibrant place to visit, live in and work in. It has a lifeblood coursing through it, consisting of its industry, commerce, educational establishments, shops, housing and the desire of its residents to develop a sense of community here.

 Posted by at 7:15 am
Oct 212013
 

By Order of Sir Titus Salt Bart Throughout the village, cleanliness, cheerfulness, and order must reign supreme. Only persons who are good, obedient, honest and hardworking will be allocated a house in each village. Anyone caught in a state of inebriation will immediately be evicted.

 Posted by at 10:43 am
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