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The Letter from the Prime Minister to Titus Salt

Unexpected correspondence from W E Gladstone informed Titus Salt that Queen Victoria was offering him a baronetcy. Titus talked it over with friends, some of whom felt he deserved a higher honour and suggested he should turn it down.

If he did would he get another, better offer? Surely Her Maj would not be amused? Titus mulled it over. Perhaps the fact that his health hadn’t been perfect for sometime affected his thinking. After all, that was the reason for resigning as an MP eight years earlier. A baronet is an hereditary title, higher than a knighthood although not a peerage, but it would be inherited by his male descendants.

On this day 1869, he became Sir Titus Salt of Saltaire & Crow Nest (his beloved home in Lighthouse, near Halifax). Sir Patrick MacDonnell Salt born in 1932 is currently the 7th Baronet, so it was a wise decision.

Congratulations Titus!

Pictures

1. Sir Titus Salt
2. 1869 Letter from Prime Minister Gladstone to Mr Salt
3. The Salt Coat of Arms
4. Titus was a descendant of Lot’s wife – claim by the New York Tribune
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Dorothy Burrows – The Legend

Her 1985 publication helped kickstart the renaissance of Saltaire, placing it back on the map and towards UNESCO World Heritage status. Respected, unassuming Yorkshire photographer, Dorothy Burrows is also famous for her book and images of Shipley, for keeping alive memories of the charming old market town.

Always with a camera slung over her shoulder, Dorothy has been a familiar figure. Her early years were spent in Easingwold where she attended the convent school until her family moved to East Bierley. Dorothy qualified as a pharmacist in Edinburgh and worked for many years in the chemist on Gordon Terrace, in the days when you had to take your films to be processed.

Whether that sparked a lifelong interest in photography, who knows, but Dorothy was a founder member in the 1950s of the Bingley Camera Club and has shared images captured on her many travels at popular slide shows.

When she retired, Dorothy gave Anne Heald at Saltaire’s original Visitor Information Centre many photographs and told her to use them as she wished; just one example of her customary generosity.

Recently reminded that Dorothy’s books included two about Bingley and Baildon, which are now collectors’ items, I realised that I hadn’t seen her for a couple of years. A quick Google search revealed that just last month she gave a slide presentation on “Old Yorkshire” to the Normanton Camera Club. If my calculations are correct, Dorothy is now in her nineties. A legend.

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Pictures

1. Dorothy Burrows.
2. Millhands, mostly women, at Salts Mill by DB.
3. The Salts Mill weaving shed by DB.
4. Gordon Terrace, Saltaire.
5. The convent, Easingwold.
6. A DB note.
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Comment on Facebook

Lovely lady, my brother was best mates with her son, plus my gran was a cloth passer/burlers/mender at Salts Mill.x

What the Dickens ..… “terribly ill” Charles in the Saltaire Infirmary

“Mr Dickens toured the hospital when he visited two years ago….”. This intriguing quotation is from an account of Salts Hospital unearthed by local historian Roger Clarke. As well as information about the facilities and numbers of patients, the author described Charles Dickens and his very positive views about the hospital regime.

However, this record was unsigned and unattributed and until now it hasn’t been publicised. So this is actually a world exclusive.

Charles Dickens’ reading of A Christmas Carol in St George’s Hall, Bradford in 1854 is well-documented and he visited Saltaire the same year. This later unsourced report, which has been gathering dust, concluded with: “Tragically, Mr Dickens died shortly after his visit to us”; that was on June 9 1870, he was 58 years of age.

Coincidentally, not long before his death, Victoria Hall secured Dickens for a future booking, which he failed to keep through no fault of his own.

Acknowledgements
• Roger Clarke
• Alan Cattell – Forgotten Moments from History 2011

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Pictures

1. The ward in Salts Hospital, opened 1868
2. Charles Dickens’ Christmas magazine
3. Charles Dickens
... See MoreSee Less

What the Dickens ..… “terribly ill” Charles in the Saltaire Infirmary

“Mr Dickens toured the hospital when he visited two years ago….”.  This intriguing quotation is from an account of Salts Hospital unearthed by local historian Roger Clarke.  As well as information about the facilities and numbers of patients, the author described Charles Dickens and his very positive views about the hospital regime.

However, this record was unsigned and unattributed and until now it hasn’t been publicised.  So this is actually a world exclusive.

Charles Dickens’ reading of A Christmas Carol in St George’s Hall, Bradford in 1854 is well-documented and he visited Saltaire the same year.  This later unsourced report, which has been gathering dust, concluded with: “Tragically, Mr Dickens died shortly after his visit to us”; that was on June 9 1870, he was 58 years of age.

Coincidentally, not long before his death, Victoria Hall secured Dickens for a future booking, which he failed to keep through no fault of his own.

Acknowledgements
• Roger Clarke
• Alan Cattell – Forgotten Moments from History 2011

©

Pictures

1. The ward in Salts Hospital, opened 1868
2. Charles Dickens’ Christmas magazine
3. Charles DickensImage attachmentImage attachment

Hidden History in Albert Terrace, Saltaire

Ever wondered what was inside number 4 Albert Terrace in 1854? In the year after Titus Salt officially opened the mill, this was where he provided the first library for his tenants and workers. Eventually, the Institute opened in 1871 and housed the lending library and a large reference section.

If reading wasn’t your preference, there was a gym, rifle drill room and a billiards room. Now known as Victoria Hall, the building is Grade II* Listed.

Although Titus professed to have little if any time for reading, he was a member of the Leeds Philosophical & Literary Society and clearly valued it, as evidenced by this benevolence.

The Saltaire Library closed in 1993.

#LibrariesWeek2019

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Pictures

1. The site of Saltaire’s first library - 4 Albert Terrace
2. Saltaire Lending Library, The Institute
3. Gents browsing
4. Saltaire Library Reference Section
5. Victoria Hall, from the 1919 Shipley Town Guide
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Comment on Facebook

Such memories. As a child I couldn't walk far so mum & dad would sit me in a corner for hours whilst I read & read particularly Cat in a hat series, Enid Blyton & Famous Five ❤️

Find memories if going to the library, not in Albert terrace though lol

I remember the library being like that in the early 1970s. My dad used to take me to renew "Noggin The Nog and the Moon Mouse".

Crazed Son-in Law Stabs Titus Salt’s Father

Daniel Salt, respectable and retired wool stapler, businessman and politician, was attacked in his home in on this day 1840 by his daughter Grace’s husband.

Grace, aged 28 at the time of the incident, had married Charles Smithies just three years earlier in St Peter’s, Bradford, now Bradford Cathedral. Charles was a worsted spinner who declared bankruptcy in 1840. Grace left him and went back to live with her parents. Subsequent events were to vindicate the Salts’ decision to support their daughter abandoning the marital home with her children.

On 1st October 1840, Charles Smithies attempted to stab Daniel several times with the intention of maiming him. He left Daniel with injuries to his left ear, was arrested and committed to the Assizes at York for trial.

It would appear that Grace did not reconcile with her husband who died in Wolverhampton aged 54 in 1867. Grace lived to 1873 when her worldly goods amounted to less than £300, under £1,500 at today’s rates.

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Pictures

1. Daniel Salt
2. Manningham Lane Bradford, oozing elegance and wealth
3. York Assizes
... See MoreSee Less

Crazed Son-in Law Stabs Titus Salt’s Father

Daniel Salt, respectable and retired wool stapler, businessman and politician, was attacked in his home in on this day 1840 by his daughter Grace’s husband.

Grace, aged 28 at the time of the incident, had married Charles Smithies just three years earlier in St Peter’s, Bradford, now Bradford Cathedral.  Charles was a worsted spinner who declared bankruptcy in 1840.  Grace left him and went back to live with her parents.  Subsequent events were to vindicate the Salts’ decision to support their daughter abandoning the marital home with her children.

On 1st October 1840, Charles Smithies attempted to stab Daniel several times with the intention of maiming him.  He left Daniel with injuries to his left ear, was arrested and committed to the Assizes at York for trial.

It would appear that Grace did not reconcile with her husband who died in Wolverhampton aged 54 in 1867.  Grace lived to 1873 when her worldly goods amounted to less than £300, under £1,500 at today’s rates.

©

Pictures

1. Daniel Salt
2. Manningham Lane Bradford, oozing elegance and wealth
3. York AssizesImage attachmentImage attachment
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Aug 172016
 
Great Canal Journeys - Saltaire - With Timothy West & Prunella Scales

This Channel 4 programme featuring Saltaire, located on the Leeds Liverpool canal is expected to be broadcast this autumn (2016). UPDATE – Bit earlier than we expected – it was broadcast 31st August 2016 on Channel 4. Link at the bottom of the page. In May Saltaire tour guide and historian Maria Glot was delighted …[Click Here To Read More]

 Posted by at 3:19 pm
Aug 172016
 

Some of the barges and the boat people that navigated the Leeds Liverpool canal during the time of Titus Salt. 1861 Name of Boat 1. Hoboara – The Industry Of Shipley….. Occupants:  Joseph Illingworth, married aged 34 years – master of canal barge, born in Holbeck, Leeds Thomas Mason, unmarried aged 35  – mate on canal barge, …[Click Here To Read More]

 Posted by at 3:04 pm
Apr 222016
 
SALTS WALKS & TALKS MAKING HISTORY FOR 20 YEARS

Saltaire’s favourite historian, Clive Woods, and Maria Glot guided for the first time as “Salts Walks” on 10 April 1996 from Anne and Roger Heald’s Saltaire Gift & Visitor Centre on Victoria Road. This inspired venture later became Saltaire’s first networked tourist information centre and ran until 2006. That first guided walk on that Sunday …[Click Here To Read More]

 Posted by at 1:57 pm
May 012015
 
BBC Countryfile Visit Saltaire

See Maria and Saltaire on Countryfile on BBC1 Sunday 17th May 2015. Watch it Here. The main Saltaire coverage starts 20 minutes in, again after 34.30 and some fantastic archive footage of Shipley Glen and the Tramway from 49 minutes. The Countryfile team came to Saltaire and was entranced by the Rules of the Village. Countryfile …[Click Here To Read More]

 Posted by at 4:19 pm
Feb 082015
 

Model Villages with Dates, Founder and Industry. From Fulneck Pudsey Leeds in 1742 to Welwyn Garden City New Town in 1919.   Village Founded Founder Industry  Fulneck Pudsey Leeds 1742  Moravian Settlement  Religion/Education   Cromford Derbyshire  1771  Richard Arkwright 1771-1858   Textiles  Style Cheshire 1784  Strutts & Greg  Textile Mill   New Lanark Scotland  c.1800  Robert Owen 1771-1858  …[Click Here To Read More]

 Posted by at 7:12 pm
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