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3,000 Tons of Snow Shovelled - on this day 1877

Although the Salt family wanted a private funeral, a mile-long procession with hundreds of dignitaries followed Sir Titus Salt’s hearse from Bradford City Hall along Manningham Lane. Even though pubs were banned in Saltaire, the Licensed Victuallers were in the cortège, paying their respects.

The weather had been biting and bitter and workmen worked hard to clear the funeral route of mountains of snow.

At Manningham Park, 320 mourners from Shipley and Saltaire joined for the journey to the mausoleum at the Congregational Church at Saltaire.

100,000 had people lined the route of Bradford’s largest ever final farewell to a most respected citizen.

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3,000 Tons of Snow Shovelled - on this day 1877

Although the Salt family wanted a private funeral, a mile-long procession with hundreds of dignitaries followed Sir Titus Salt’s hearse from Bradford City Hall along Manningham Lane.  Even though pubs were banned in Saltaire, the Licensed Victuallers were in the cortège, paying their respects.

The weather had been biting and bitter and workmen worked hard to clear the funeral route of mountains of snow.

At Manningham Park, 320 mourners from Shipley and Saltaire joined for the journey to the mausoleum at the Congregational Church at Saltaire.

100,000 had people lined the route of Bradford’s largest ever final farewell to a most respected citizen.

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How did Titus Salt vote 160 years ago in the 1859 general election?

Without a doubt he placed a cross in the box next to his own name. Titus was asked to stand for the House of Commons by the Bradford Chamber of Commerce and was one of three candidates for two seats. He came second and beat his Conservative rival by 498 votes.

Titus served as a Liberal MP for two years. It’s fair to say that the very different life he led in London did not appeal. Said to have been diffident in large gatherings, he never once spoke in the House of Commons although he attended and voted regularly.

In February 1861, Titus “took the Chiltern Hundreds”, a procedural device for resigning as an MP. His biographer, the Reverend Balgarnie, cited poor health and gouty twinges as Mr Salt’s reasons for heading back up North. Ouch!

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Pictures

1. Titus Salt by Maull and Polyblank, photographers of London
2. Interior of the Victorian House of Commons
3. Election leaflet published by a supporter rebutting fake news about Titus
4. Exterior of the Palace of Westminster
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Comment on Facebook

I wonder what percentage of the population of Bradford were eligible to vote in the 1859 election.

Saltaire & The Demon Drink – Bucking The Trend

It’s common knowledge that there were no pubs in Saltaire although wine to drink at home was for sale from the chemist on Victoria Road. There was however a glut of enterprising publicans nearby and according to Titus Salt Jnr, 12 public houses & beer shops within a 10 minute walk. So when the Woodman Inn on Saltaire Road came up for sale in 1872, Salts Mill was determined to close it & snapped it up.

After Sir Titus died in 1876, it would appear that the Salts became a little more relaxed about the issue. An application for a licence to sell alcohol in Saltaire in 1892 was supported by the family but was withdrawn following strong objections from residents.

The 1908 Licensing Bill aimed to close 50% of pubs and to ban women from working in them. Nationally, protests were held against the proposed law, but here a demonstration in favour marched down Saltaire Road. To the relief of others, the Bill was defeated in the House of Lords.

History repeated itself in 1976 when Saltaire residents strongly objected to an application for a liquor licence and it was refused by Keighley Magistrates.

Did Sir Titus enjoy a tipple? The Rosse opened in 1870 on the edge of the village but there’s no evidence that he ever popped in for a swift half. However, fine wine was served to guests at the Salt mansion, Crow Nest in Lightcliffe and its well-stocked wine cellar was included in Titus’s will, so yes you bet he did.

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Pictures

1. Page 1 of 1872 letter from Titus Salt Junior
2. Last page of Titus Salt Jnr’s letter
3. 1892 newspaper report
4. Demonstration on Saltaire Road 1908
5. Shipley Times & Express 1976
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125 Years of Salt Family Links to Bradford Cathedral

St Peter’s Parish Church became Bradford Cathedral 100 years ago in November 1919. Seventy years earlier whilst Titus Salt was Mayor, the graveyard was jam packed with most of the 426 victims of the cholera epidemic. As bones protruded from the soil, something had to be done.

Titus was an original member of the company that bought the 26 acres in 1851 which became Grade II* Listed Undercliffe Cemetery and where some of the mausoleums are larger than Barrett Homes.

A Bradford resident, Titus would surely have been at younger sister Grace’s wedding in March 1837 to Charles Smithies at St Peter’s. Sadly, it was not a happy union. Charles was declared bankrupt three years later and Grace fled to her parents’ home with the children.

“Every cloud has a silver lining”. For Titus’s sister this proved to be the case. Her daughter Maude Alice married well and her grandson, Sir Edward Maufe was the nationally acclaimed architect who designed the extension to Bradford Cathedral that was completed in 1963. His most famous building is probably Guildford Cathedral; just one of the talented descendants of Daniel and Grace Salt, Titus’s parents.

Congratulations to Bradford Cathedral on its centenary – 25 November 2019

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Pictures

1. The 14th century church of St Peter’s pre-1918.
2. Illustration of the conditions that led to the cholera outbreak.
3. Sir Edward’s design for the extension to Bradford Cathedral.
4. Sir Edward Maufe (12.12.1883 – 12.12.1974)
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7 Year Old Labourer in Saltaire Mill Deserves a Blue Plaque

In 1862 a young boy started working for Titus Salt in Salts Mill. The seventh son of a feckless father, Joseph Wright had been born into an impoverished family in Park Hill, Thackley. After a spell in Clayton workhouse, at aged 5 he toiled as a “donkey boy” in a Shipley quarry.

Whilst Joseph worked in Saltaire he attended the factory school. Much has been written of this free education but it was very rudimentary according to Joseph. He just about learnt his letters and numbers but not to read and write.

During his teenage years Joseph became determined to learn. He attended night classes at the Bradford Mechanics Institute and went to Heidelberg for several years, where he worked and studied, learning French, German and Latin.

A brilliant scholar and linguist, Joseph was offered a teaching post in Philology at Oxford University, eventually becoming an Oxford Don. He wrote several books and published ‘A Grammar of the Dialect of Windhill’ in 1892, the first of its kind and the six-volume ‘English Dialect Dictionary 1898 – 1905’, for which he is still highly respected.

Joseph never forgot his roots. He named his Oxford home “Thackley” and regularly visited Yorkshire where he was involved in the Windhill Liberal Club and the Yorkshire Dialect Society.

Joseph married in 1896 and had a son and daughter, Willie Boy and Mary. Tragically, both died in childhood; Willie Boy from a poisonous insect bite and Mary from pneumonia. Joseph died in 1930, also from pneumonia. His last word was “dictionary”.

Elizabeth Mary Lea, his wife, published a biography of Joseph in 1932.

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Pictures

1. Joseph & Elizabeth Wright with infants Willie Boy and Mary
2. Joseph Wright (31.10.1855 – 27.2.1930) aged 12.
3. Joseph in his study at Oxford University
4. The mature Joseph back in his childhood haunts in Yorkshire
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Comment on Facebook

So interesting and also how sad in those days a reason for dying was from a ‘poisonous insect bite.’ We’re so lucky!

he was ana amazing man

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Aug 172016
 
Great Canal Journeys - Saltaire - With Timothy West & Prunella Scales

This Channel 4 programme featuring Saltaire, located on the Leeds Liverpool canal is expected to be broadcast this autumn (2016). UPDATE – Bit earlier than we expected – it was broadcast 31st August 2016 on Channel 4. Link at the bottom of the page. In May Saltaire tour guide and historian Maria Glot was delighted …[Click Here To Read More]

 Posted by at 3:19 pm
Aug 172016
 

Some of the barges and the boat people that navigated the Leeds Liverpool canal during the time of Titus Salt. 1861 Name of Boat 1. Hoboara – The Industry Of Shipley….. Occupants:  Joseph Illingworth, married aged 34 years – master of canal barge, born in Holbeck, Leeds Thomas Mason, unmarried aged 35  – mate on canal barge, …[Click Here To Read More]

 Posted by at 3:04 pm
Apr 222016
 
SALTS WALKS & TALKS MAKING HISTORY FOR 20 YEARS

Saltaire’s favourite historian, Clive Woods, and Maria Glot guided for the first time as “Salts Walks” on 10 April 1996 from Anne and Roger Heald’s Saltaire Gift & Visitor Centre on Victoria Road. This inspired venture later became Saltaire’s first networked tourist information centre and ran until 2006. That first guided walk on that Sunday …[Click Here To Read More]

 Posted by at 1:57 pm
May 012015
 
BBC Countryfile Visit Saltaire

See Maria and Saltaire on Countryfile on BBC1 Sunday 17th May 2015. Watch it Here. The main Saltaire coverage starts 20 minutes in, again after 34.30 and some fantastic archive footage of Shipley Glen and the Tramway from 49 minutes. The Countryfile team came to Saltaire and was entranced by the Rules of the Village. Countryfile …[Click Here To Read More]

 Posted by at 4:19 pm
Feb 082015
 

Model Villages with Dates, Founder and Industry. From Fulneck Pudsey Leeds in 1742 to Welwyn Garden City New Town in 1919.   Village Founded Founder Industry  Fulneck Pudsey Leeds 1742  Moravian Settlement  Religion/Education   Cromford Derbyshire  1771  Richard Arkwright 1771-1858   Textiles  Style Cheshire 1784  Strutts & Greg  Textile Mill   New Lanark Scotland  c.1800  Robert Owen 1771-1858  …[Click Here To Read More]

 Posted by at 7:12 pm
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